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Artificial intelligence is helping NASA understand exactly how an exposed lava lake in Ethiopia is changing. On January 21, a fissure opened at the top of Ethiopia's Erta Ale volcano -- one of the few in the world with an active lava lake in its caldera. Volcanologists sent out requests for …

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Not much plant sex happens without pollinator insects: Bees, flies or butterflies transfer the male pollen grains to the stigma of a plant's female style, thereby ensuring its sexual reproduction. Researchers from the Department of Systematic and Evolutionary Botany at the University of Zurich now reveal that pollinator insects also …

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Marine researchers have made sure that their research drones aren't disturbing their research subjects, shows a report in Frontiers in Marine Science. And they're hoping that others will follow their example to help protect wildlife in the future.We've all seen the videos--drones and wildlife don't always get along. Unmanned aerial …

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Conventional wisdom holds that sharks can't be harvested in a sustainable manner because they are long-lived animals. It takes time for them to reproduce and grow in numbers. But, researchers reporting in Current Biology on February 6 have evidence to suggest that sustainable shark fishing can be done with careful, …

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The world's first astrophysics-ecology drone project at Liverpool John Moores University could be the answer to many global conservation efforts. Four hundred years ago Galileo created a revolution by pointing his telescope to the skies. Now an astrophysicist and an ecologist from Liverpool John Moores University (LJMU) are reversing this perspective …

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University of Montana doctoral candidate Robin Steenweg shows how remote cameras can transform monitoring wildlife and habitat biodiversity worldwide in a paper published Feb. 1 in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.He and study co-authors, including UM Professors Mark Hebblewhite and Jedediah Brodie, call for a global network …

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Non-indigenous species (NIS) are harming indigenous species and habitats in the Mediterranean Sea, impairing potentially exploitable marine resources and raising concern about human health issues, according to a new Tel Aviv University study. The 2015 expansion of the Suez Canal, one of the world's most important corridors of commerce, facilitated an …

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New evidence involving the ancient poop of some of the huge and astonishing megafauna creatures that once roamed Australia indicates the primary cause of their extinction around 45,000 years ago was likely a result of humans, not climate change. Led by Monash University in Victoria, Australia and the University of Colorado …

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Scans of preserved Tasmanian tiger brains suggest that these extinct predators devoted more of the cortex to complex cognition associated with predation compared to modern Tasmanian devils, according to a study published January 18, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Gregory Berns from Emory University, US, and Ken …

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Minimizing air resistance and friction with snow is key to elite performance in downhill skiing. Experiments in wind tunnels have revealed the total drag experienced by skiers, but have not provided precise data on which parts of the body cause the most air resistance when adopting the full-tuck position.A new …

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Could learning to play an instrument help the elderly react faster and stay alert?Quite likely, according to a new study by Université de Montréal's School of Speech Language Pathology and Audiology, part of UdeM's medical faculty.Published in the U.S. journal Brain and Cognition, the study shows that musicians have faster reaction …

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Greater Sage-Grouse depend on large, intact tracts of the sagebrush habitat. Current sage-grouse conservation plans focus on protecting selected "priority areas," but these areas vary in size and proximity to each other--will they be able to sustain thriving, interconnected populations over time? A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications …

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Engineers at the University of California, Riverside have taken inspiration from biological evolution and the energy savings garnered by birds flying in formation to improve the efficiency of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) by more than 30 percent. Titled "Development and Evaluation of an Evolutionary Algorithm-Based Online Energy Management System for …

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Hong Kong is best known as a bustling harbour, a financial centre and a shoppers' paradise, with a dense burgeoning population of seven million impacting its natural environment. Yet, away from the skyscrapers and the pressures of anthropogenic influence, Hong Kong has a record of 5,943 marine species according to …

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A group of beautiful snout moths from China was revised by three scientists from the Institute of Zoology at the Chinese Academy of Sciences.In their study, recently published in the open access journal Zookeys, entomologists Dr. Mingqiang Wang, Dr. Fuqiang Chen and Prof. Chunsheng Wu describe five new species and …

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The things we consume, from iPhones to cars to IKEA furniture, have costs that go well beyond their purchase price. What if the soybeans used to make that tofu you ate last night were grown in fields that were hewn out of tropical rainforests? Or if that tee-shirt you bought …

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English is now considered the common language, or 'lingua franca', of global science. All major scientific journals seemingly publish in English, despite the fact that their pages contain research from across the globe. However, a new study suggests that over a third of new scientific reports are published in languages other …

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Contact lenses, spectacles and eye implants are now being made more accurately thanks to research instruments flying on the International Space Station.With the competitive lens market offering increasingly complex products such as varifocal and high-definition contact lenses, precisely shaping a lens is critical.Every lens must be thoroughly checked to ensure …

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Older people who help and support others are also doing themselves a favor. An international research team has found that grandparents who care for their grandchildren on average live longer than grandparents who do not. The researchers conducted survival analyses of over 500 people aged between 70 and 103 years, …

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Whether a wild cottonmouth snake will attempt to strike in an encounter depends on its baseline stress level, according to a team of scientists led by undergraduate researcher Mark Herr."Most people think a snake is more likely to strike after you have handled or harassed it," said Tracy Langkilde, professor …

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A type of natural selection, called stabilizing selection, is thought to maintain functional characteristics in species. But it is difficult to find evidence of this type of selection through research.“Random genetic drift”, on the other hand, where genetic variations occur randomly over time, is an evolutionary process that affects characteristics …

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Scientists have used a laser to tickle atoms of antimatter and make them shine, a key step toward answering one of the great riddles of the universe. Theory predicts that the Big Bang produced equal amounts of matter and antimatter. Since they cancel each other out, scientists have been trying to …

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In early 2014, when a large-scale marine heat wave in the Pacific Ocean produced temperature anomalies greater than anything seen since record keeping began in the early 1900s, marine scientists saw something else, too: opportunity. Ocean researchers at UC Santa Barbara quickly seized the chance to evaluate the sentinel status of …

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Researchers from the University of Georgia have found that invasive scavenger species on Hawaii Island, or the Big Island of Hawaii, may be especially successful invaders because they are formidable scavengers of carcasses of other animals and after death, a nutrient resource for other invasive scavengers.The team of researchers from …

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We all know that water melts at 0°C. However, already 150 years ago the famous physicist Michael Faraday discovered that at the surface of frozen ice, well below 0°C, a thin film of liquid-like water is present. This thin film makes ice slippery and is crucial for the motion of …

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